Reviews

NYFF Critic's Choice - "Carlos"


Edgar Ramirez is "indelible" in "Carlos," one of The Independent's top picks from NYFF 2010.

The Independent's senior film critic Kurt Brokaw offers his picks from the 2010 New York Film Festival, which runs September 24th through October 10th. For a complete list of his selections, click here.

NYFF Critic's Choice - "Certified Copy"


Juliette Binoche in "Certified Copy."

The Independent's senior film critic Kurt Brokaw offers his picks from the 2010 New York Film Festival, which runs September 24th through October 10th. For a complete list of his selections, click here.

NYFF Critic's Choice - "Of Gods and Men"


From "Of Gods and Men."

The Independent's senior film critic Kurt Brokaw offers his picks from the 2010 New York Film Festival, which runs September 24th through October 10th. For a complete list of his selections, click here.

New York Film Festival 2010 - Critic's Choice


Yahima Torres as "Black Venus."

The Independent's senior film critic Kurt Brokaw offers his picks from the 2010 New York Film Festival. New films will be added to this list throughout the fest, which runs September 24th through October 10th.

The Independent's senior film critic Kurt Brokaw offers his picks from the 2010 New York Film Festival. Below are excerpts of full reviews. New films will be added to this list throughout the fest, which runs September 24th through October 10th.

The Robber
(Benjamin Heisenberg. 2010. Austria-Germany. 96 min.)

“Catfish” and Lies the Internet Never Told You

Is "Catfish" the warm-up act for this fall’s "The Social Network," the David Fincher/Aaron Sorkin big-budget opening night selection of the New York Film Festival?


"Catfish" premiered at Sundance in 2010 and opens in theaters September 17th.

In anticipation of the New York Film Festival, and its already ad-blitzed premiere of The Social Network, Kurt Brokaw reviews Catfish, a topsy-turvy Facebook reality thriller.

You might want to refresh your memory of Marc Ecko’s 2007 fabulously successful lnternet stunt—the spray-painting of what seems to be

Behind the Scenes with Six Masters of Design

In a special to The Independent, Kurt Brokaw reviews the new documentary, “Something’s Gonna Live.”


Henry Bumstead, Albert Nozaki, and Robert Boyle at the Paramount back lot.

The documentary Something's Gonna Live, and Kurt Brokaw's review of it, pay homage to the often unsung cinematic auteurs -- production designers, art directors, and directors of photography. Brokaw says it's, "one to watch for."

Chances are you didn’t know who decided to make Jimmy Stewart a stamp collector in Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo, but it was the production designer, Henry “Bummy” Bumstead. You might also have forgotten who aged the wood in the bleak gallows from which the convicted killers in In Cold Blood are hanged, but that was another production designer, Robert Boyle.

3-D (Like it Used to Be) in ‘53

Critic Kurt Brokaw reflects on life as a theater staffer in 3-D's heyday, and on some of the '50s best 3-D films, recently showcased at the Film Forum in New York.


Arlene Dahl (left) fell for Fernando Lamas (right) both on and off screen in "Sangaree."

The omnipresence of today's 3-D has roots in grand theaters outfitted with twin projectors that brought the scary "Gill-Man" to life from the Black Lagoon and threatened to pour wax all over your sweetheart and install him or her in a Wax Museum. Kurt Brokaw witnessed 3-D's golden era firsthand and recently saw the best from 1953-54 again, wearing his customized 3D frames. How does he think today's 3-D experiences stack up?

In 1953 and ‘54, this critic was popping the popcorn, changing the marquee, and patrolling the aisles of the Ritz Theater in Indianapolis, making sure couples kept both feet on the floor at all times. Being on staff at a neighborhood movie house as a high school student was the perfect introduction to the film business—particularly to 3-D.

On the Fast Track of Derby History

Roller derby expert Steven LaFond (aka “Pelvis Costello”) recommends five documentaries that chart the rise of the modern roller derby revival.


From "Blood on the Flat Track," (photo by Michael Coyote).

According to Steven LaFond, err...Pelvis Costello, roller derby is back. With a vengeance. Get to know the real story behind its reemergence with five must-see documentaries, from the classic Blood on the Flat Track to the most recent Hugs and Bruises.

Late last year, Drew Barrymore’s Whip It was released in theaters, giving the mainstream a fictional take on the world of modern roller derby. The story, adapted from the novel Derby Girl by Shauna Cross, focuses on an outcast teen who finds confidence and her inner power by joining the banked track league of Austin, Texas.

Tribeca 2010 Critic's Choice: "Cairo Time"

Kurt Brokaw hand selects and reviews films from Tribeca 2010.


Patricia Clarkson as Juliette and Alexander Siddig as Tareq in "Cairo Time."

Cairo Time

(Ruba Nadda. 2009. Canada/Ireland/Egypt. 89 min.)

Tribeca 2010 Critic's Choice: "Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll"

Kurt Brokaw hand selects and reviews films from Tribeca 2010.


Andy Serkis as Ian Dury.

Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll

(Mat Whitecross. 2009. UK. 115 min.)

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